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Dark vs. Light Liquor: Which Makes You More Hungover?

Dark vs. Light Liquor: Which Makes You More Hungover?


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If you’re looking to be productive the next day, there are tactics involved

Trying to minimize your hangover? Steer clear of the dark stuff.

Let’s talk hangovers. The damage that your whiskey ginger will have on your morning after may be lingering in the back of your mind as you sip your drink, but at that point, it might be too late. To help you avoid a hangover all together (instead of enlightening you on ways to cure one), here’s a helpful tip: Dark liquor is not your friend.

When you’re sipping on your favorite cocktail, chances are, the fermenting process isn’t the first thing on your mind. That’s fair, but you don’t have to be a mixologist to know which liquor does what to your body. Hint: The fermenting process has a lot to do with it.

Many alcoholic beverages — like bourbon and vodka — contain byproducts called congeners. Congeners are leftovers of materials used when the liquors are created, and some liquors contain more than others. According to EurekAlert, bourbon, for example, has 37 times the amount of congeners that vodka has.

Think about it this way: The range of colors in liquor is caused by different chemical mixtures. Each type of liquor is made with different materials, and some materials are harder for your body to digest. The more chemicals and congeners your body needs to digest, the harder it will be on your head, stomach, and overall health.

Generally, balance is the key to avoiding a horrid hangover. If you are casually swigging a cocktail of any kind, the type of liquor will make little to no difference after the fact. However, if you’re throwing ‘em back or ordering straight liquor on the rocks, choose your spirit with caution, especially if you need to be productive the next day.


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


Light Roast vs. Dark Roast Coffee: Which Packs More Health Perks?

Both contain antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, but one brew takes the win, says a new study.

Coffee fanatics already know that their beverage of choice is rich in antioxidants, which may explain many of the health benefits associated with a regular morning joe or afternoon iced latte. But if you really want to maximize those good-for-you chemicals in every cup, a new study suggests opting for a light roast over dark.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, Korean researchers compared coffees of several different roasting levels, analyzing their caffeine content and levels of chlorogenic acid, a well-known antioxidant. They also exposed extract of each coffee to human cell cultures to test their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

The results? The lighter the roast, the higher the chlorogenic acid content𠅊nd the better the coffee extract protected human cells against oxidation (cell damage) and inflammation when tested in the lab. Caffeine levels, on the other hand, did not vary significantly between samples.

These cell-culture findings could potentially translate to real-life benefits, says Sampath Parthasarathy, PhD, interim associate dean at the University of Central Florida School of Medicine and Journal of Medicinal Food editor-in-chief𠅋ut they need to be replicated in human trials before any definite conclusions can be formed.

“We know that antioxidants protect against many health problems, and we also know that inflammation is the basis of many chronic diseases, whether it is diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says Parthasarathy, who was not involved in the new study. 𠇋ut these diseases are progressive and occur over a long period of time, and you can’t see long-term benefits in a test-tube study.”

The study specifically looked at Arabica coffee beans, roasted at levels corresponding to “light,” “medium,” 𠇌ity,” and 𠇏rench” roasts. The roasted beans were then ground and run through an espresso machine to obtain the extract used in testing.

Parthasarathy says it’s not surprising that lighter roasts would have higher levels of antioxidant activity. “When we roast something, we expose it to air,” he says. “There’s also a time element and a temperature element involved, and all of those things contribute to oxidation.”

This depletes the antioxidant molecules present in the coffee grinds, he continues. “They sacrifice themselves during the roasting process,” he says. 𠇋ut ideally we would want to preserve them as much as possible, so they can have a better effect inside the body rather than getting wasted outside of it.”

While antioxidants aren’t always anti-inflammatory (and anti-inflammatory compounds aren’t always antioxidants), Parthasarathy says the two often go hand-in-hand.

If you love dark roasts for their flavor, Parthasarathy says you’re still likely getting some of the benefits. But cup for cup, lighter blends may have more powerful effects.

“If both types have the same amount of caffeine, why would you compromising on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect?” he says. “People might have to ask themselves, to what extent is the aroma important to them? Are they drinking coffee for health, or just to feel good?”

Future studies may also help coffee producers make more health-focused decisions on the type of coffee and the level of roasting they choose to promote, he notes. Companies like Starbucks tout their dark French roast for its rich flavor, he says, 𠇋ut it may not be better for health benefits.”

To get our best wellness tips delivered to you inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter

Of course, how long coffee is roasted for is only part of the equation when it comes to maximizing its superfood potential. Parthasarathy would also like to see more research on different types of beans grown in different regions and climates, and on different brewing processes, as well—like cold brew versus conventional.

“People drink coffee for flavor and for caffeine and for many other reasons, and many people won’t even want to start their day without it,” he says. “Most people don’t consider antioxidants or anti-inflammatory properties, but this study brings to light that the benefits of coffee𠅎specially certain types of coffee—may be beyond what most people think.”


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