ke.haerentanimo.net
New recipes

Mixed Greens with Tangerines and Shaved Fennel Recipe

Mixed Greens with Tangerines and Shaved Fennel Recipe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons chopped shallot
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated tangerine peel
  • 1 5-ounce package mixed baby greens
  • 2 medium fennel bulbs, very thinly sliced crosswise, fronds chopped
  • 4 tangerines, peeled, segmented

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk first 4 ingredients in small bowl. Season dressing with salt and pepper.

  • Divide greens among 4 plates. Scatter sliced fennel and tangerines over. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Drizzle dressing over, sprinkle with chopped fronds, and serve.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains the following: Calories (kcal) 199.26t %Calorie from Fat 65.4 Fat (g) 14.48t Saturated Fat (g) 2.00 t Cholesterol (mg) 0t Carbohydrates (g) 17.44 t Dietary Fiber (g) 5.04 t Total Sugars (g) 7.05 t Net Carbs (g) 12.40t Protein (g) 2.43Reviews Section

Avocado Citrus Salad

There’s fat, good fat, and great fat. Avocados fall into the last category—full of brain-boosting vitamin E and a monounsaturated fat that helps lower blood pressure, which can help lower the risk of cognitive impairment. The same fat also serves to signal the gut and brain that satiation is taking place, which keeps us from overeating. In this delicate salad, the avocado acts as a creamy bass note for the tart pop of the grapefruit and the perky citrus-ginger vinaigrette.

1 medium grapefruit or blood orange
Freshly squeezed grapefruit juice
1 teaspoon lemon zest
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon grated ginger
Sea salt
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 cups loosely packed arugula or mixed greens
1/2 cup shaved fennel or celery
1/4 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped
1 avocado, sliced

Supreme the grapefruit . When all the segments are out, squeeze the remaining juice into a small bowl and add more grapefruit juice as needed to make 2 tablespoons. Add the zest, lemon juice, lime juice, honey, ginger, and 1/4 teaspoon of salt and stir to combine. Slowly pour in the olive oil, whisking all the while, and continue whisking until smooth. Transfer to a small container with a fitted lid and shake well.

Mix the arugula, fennel, and mint in a large bowl. Add a tablespoon or two of the dressing and toss. Top with the avocado and grapefruit segments and drizzle with a little more dressing and a light sprinkle of salt.

VARIATIONS: Make this salad heartier by adding grilled shrimp or salmon. Coat 8 ounces of peeled, deveined shrimp or salmon fillet with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. On a grill or in a grill pan, cook over medium high heat until just cooked and opaque, about 2 minutes for shrimp or 3 to 4 minutes for salmon.

COOK'S NOTE: Oranges or tangerines will make a lovely substitution for the grapefruit.

Reprinted with permission from The Healthy Mind Cookbook Copyright © 2015 by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson, Ten Speed Press, a division of the Crown Publishing Group, Berkeley, CA.


24 fennel and ginger salad Recipes

Ginger-Mango Flank Steak with Fennel Slaw

Ginger-Mango Flank Steak with Fennel Slaw

Salad of Warm Asparagus With Rhubarb-Vinaigrette

Salad of Warm Asparagus With Rhubarb-Vinaigrette

Fried Cheese in Ginger Biscuits on Fennel Salad

Fried Cheese in Ginger Biscuits on Fennel Salad

Sake Poached Salmon with Somen and Fennel Salad Wasabi and Leftovers: Salmon Salad Sandwich with Taro Chips (Ming Tsai)

Sake Poached Salmon with Somen and Fennel Salad Wasabi and Leftovers: Salmon Salad Sandwich with Taro Chips (Ming Tsai)

Turkey, Fennel and Cherry Salad

Turkey, Fennel and Cherry Salad

Brussels Sprouts, Orange, and Fennel Salad

Brussels Sprouts, Orange, and Fennel Salad

Yellow Grapefruit, Avocado and Fennel Salad

Yellow Grapefruit, Avocado and Fennel Salad

Radicchio And Grean Bean Salad With Citrus Vinaigr.

Radicchio And Grean Bean Salad With Citrus Vinaigr.

Composed Salad of Fennel, Oven-Dried Pears, and Maytag Blue Cheese

Composed Salad of Fennel, Oven-Dried Pears, and Maytag Blue Cheese

Crispy Pan Seared Florida Snapper with Passion Fruit Cream and Florida Citrus and Shaved Fennel Salad, Garnished with Sauteed Florida Gulf Shrimp and Spicy Green Mango Jam

Applications

Horseradish leaves can be used in both raw and cooked preparations such as boiling, steaming, and sautéing. Young, tender leaves can be added whole to salads, chopped and added to vegetable dishes, or minced and incorporated into salad dressings. They can also be used to make lettuce wraps, dolmades, or used instead of seaweed in sushi rolls. Horseradish leaves can be combined with basil when making pesto or other sauces and also added to smoothies for a peppery kick. Older horseradish leaves can be chopped and added to soups or cooked with other leafy greens such as kale and cabbage. Larger and mature leaves may have a tough texture, so steaming will help make them tender. Horseradish leaves pair well with red meat, shellfish, eggs, sushi, chickpeas, avocado, tomatoes, leafy greens, and basil. They will keep for a couple of days when stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.


Fennel is native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean region, where it has been used for centuries as a spice and for medicinal purposes. Ancient Greeks referred to Fennel as "marathron" due to its prolific wild growth in one field where the great battle, the Battle of Marathron, was said to be fought. In the 1700's Fennel was used in the production of the patented elixir absinthe.


Restaurants currently purchasing this product as an ingredient for their menu.
Alila Marea Beach Resort Encinitas CA 805-539-9719
Caffe Calabria Coffee Roasting Company San Diego CA 619-683-7787
Juniper & Ivy San Diego CA 858-481-3666
Bernardo Heights Country Club San Diego CA 858-487-4022
Terra Restaurant San Diego CA 619-293-7088
Common Theory San Diego CA 858-384-7974
Donna Jean San Diego CA
PFC Fitness Camp Carlsbad CA 888-488-8936
Saiko Sushi-North Park San Diego CA 619-886-6656
Bali Hai Restaurant San Diego CA 619-222-1181
Lafayette Hotel San Diego CA 619-296-2101
Callie San Diego CA 619-947-9036
Brigantine La Mesa La Mesa CA 619-465-1935
Wrench and Rodent Oceanside CA 760-840-1976
Ballast Point Restaurant - Miramar San Diego CA 858-790-6900
Yoann Taboyan, Personal Chef San Diego CA 347-277-1958
Firefly Beach San Diego CA 619-222-6440
Top of the Market San Diego CA 619-234-4867
Siamo Napoli San Diego CA 619-300-4810
The Roxy Encinitas Encinitas CA 760-230-2899
Show the other 181.
Herb & Sea Encinitas CA 858-587-6601
Hotel Republic San Diego San Diego CA 951-756-9357
JRDN Restaurant San Diego CA 858-270-5736
Oyster and Pearl Bar Restaurant La Mesa CA 619-303-8118
Vista Valley Vista CA 760-758-2800
The Seabird Resort Oceanside CA 951-704-9703
Born & Raised San Diego CA 619-944-1631
UCSD Food & Nutrition Department La Jolla San Diego CA 808-868-8639
Waters Catering San Diego CA 619-276-8803 x4
Pacifica Del Mar Del Mar CA 858-792-0505
The Miller's Table Oceanside CA 310-694-4091
Coast Catering Escondido CA 619-295-3173
Bridges at Rancho Santa Fe Rancho Santa Fe CA 858-759-6063
Third Corner Encinitas Encinitas CA 619-417-9251
Hotel Del Coronado Serea Restaurant Coronado CA 619-435-6611
Tribute Pizza San Diego CA 858-220-0030
Barbarella La Jolla La Jolla CA 858-454-7373
Mesa College San Diego CA 619-388-2240
Bernini's Bistro La Jolla CA 858-454-5013
Great Maple La Jolla UTC San Diego CA 858-886-7403
Kitchens For Good San Diego CA 619-450-4040
Rovino The Foodery San Diego CA 619-204-3666
Kappa Sushi San Diego CA 858-566-3388
InterContinental Vistal Kitchen San Diego CA 619-501-9400
KI's Encinitas CA 760-586-8289
Communal Coffee San Diego CA
Wet Stone Winebar and Cafe San Diego CA 619-255-2856
Pali Wine Company San Diego CA 310-893-0038
Village Vino San Diego CA 619-546-8466
Solterra Winery + Kitchen Encinitas CA 858-245-6146
Sheraton Carlsbad (7 Mile) Carlsbad CA 760-827-2400
Dolce Pane & Vino Del Mar CA 858-832-1518
Le Papagayo (Carlsbad) Carlsbad CA 949-235-5862
Brockton Villa Restaurant San Diego CA 858-454-7393
The Rose San Diego CA 619-572-7671
Volcano Rabbit San Diego CA 619-232-8226
Marriott Marina Kitchen San Diego CA 619-234-1500 x6113
The Shout House San Diego CA 619-231-6700
The Country Club Of Rancho Bernardo San Diego CA 858-451-9100
Craft and Commerce (Sekscobra Inc.) San Diego CA 619-962-5935
The Smoking Goat San Diego CA 858-232-4220
Carte Blanche Bistro & Bar Oceanside CA 619-297-3100
Capri Blu 2020 San Diego CA 858-673-5100
La Costa Glen North Carlsbad CA 760-704-1436
Mangia Mangia (Mirarmar) San Diego CA 858-736-5733
Pour House Oceanside CA 760-730-5944
Seasalt Del Mar CA 858-755-7100
Better Buzz Coffee (PB Grand) San Diego CA 619-255-4657
Brigantine Poway Poway CA 858-486-3066
UCSD Food & Nutrition Department Hillcrest San Diego CA 619-380-9840
Farmers Bottega San Diego CA 619-306-8963
Lodge at Torrey Pines Grill San Diego CA 858-453-4420
Miho (Production) San Diego CA 619-867-4295
The Bier Garden Encinitas CA 760-632-2437
Storyhouse Spirits San Diego CA 801-949-5955
Blade 1936 Oceanside CA 760-231-1456
Ballast Point Restaurant - Little Italy San Diego CA 619-298-2337
Cross Roots San Diego CA 858-245-1678
ALCE 101 Solana Beach CA 619-886-0059
Mr A's San Diego CA 619-239-1377
Marriott Del Mar San Diego CA 858-369-6029
Zeca Trading Co. San Diego CA 619-410-1576
Paradise Point Resort Main Kitchen San Diego CA 858-490-6363
Fort Oak San Diego CA 619-795-6901
The Flavor Chef (Catering) Vista CA 619-295-3172
Viejas Casino Grove Steakhouse Alpine CA 800-295-3172
Golden Door San Marcos CA 760-761-4142
Cal A Vie Vista CA 760-945-2055
Estancia Adobe San Diego CA 858-550-1000
Pepper Queen Farms Cardiff CA 858-663-4109
Cucina Enoteca Del Mar CA 619-239-2222
Catamaran San Diego CA 858-488-1081
Georges at the Cove San Diego CA 858-454-4244
Knotty Barrel- Rancho San Diego CA 858-484-8758
Toast Catering San Diego CA 858-208-9422
Larsen's Steakhouse - La Jolla San Diego CA 858-886-7561
The Wild Thyme Company San Diego CA 858-527-0226
Avant San Diego CA 858-675-8505
Stake Chophouse & Bar Coronado CA 619-522-0077
Little Lion San Diego CA 619-519-4079
Trust Restaurant San Diego CA 609-780-7572
Asti Ristorante San Diego CA 619-232-8844
Bleu Boheme San Diego CA 619-255-4167
The Tavern Coronado CA 602-628-5890
Beaumont's San Diego CA 858-459-0474
La Jolla Country Club San Diego CA 858-454-9601
Fishery San Diego CA 858-272-9985
Continental Catering Inc La Mesa CA 907-738-9264
Huntress San Diego CA 619-955-5750
Fernside San Diego CA 619-398-5156
Bistro du Marche by Tapenade La Jolla CA 858-551-7500
Harvest Kitchen (Corp Lunch) Vista CA 619-709-0938
264 Fresco (Deck Kitchen) Carlsbad CA 760-720-3737
Kettner Exchange San Diego CA 909-915-9877
Gaslamp Union Kitchen & Tap San Diego CA 619-795-9463
Beeside Balcony Del Mar CA 858-880-8105
The Corner Drafthouse San Diego CA 619-255-2631
Open Gym-Craft Meals San Diego CA 619-799-3675
Ron Oliver San Diego 619-295-3172
Little Frenchie Coronado CA 619-522-6890
Toast Cafe San Diego CA 858-208-9422
Under Belly-Uptown San Diego CA 619-269-4626
Rare Society San Diego CA 619-501-6404
Galaxy Taco La Jolla CA 858-228-5655
Oscars Brewing Company Temecula CA 619-695-2422
Burning Beard El Cajon CA 619-884-4716
Cucina Sorella San Diego CA 858-232-7808
Better Buzz Coffee (Point Loma) San Diego CA 619-222-2899
Et Voilà! French Bistro San Diego CA 858-610-8784
Home & Away - Old Town San Diego CA 619-886-1358
True Food-Fashion Valley San Diego CA 619-810-2929
WaterBar San Diego CA 619-308-6500
RoVino Rotisserie + Wine San Diego CA 619-972-6286
Craft House San Diego CA 619-948-4458
The Switchboard Restaurant and Bar Oceanside CA 760-807-7446
Barleymash San Diego CA 619-276-6700 x304
Pamplemousse Grill Solana Beach CA 858-792-9090
Encontro North Park San Diego CA 310-955-6333
Tartine Coronado CA 619-435-4323
Miho (Delivery) San Diego CA 619-867-4295
Chef Drew Mc Partlin San Diego CA 619-990-9201
Four Seasons Residence Club Carlsbad CA 760-603-6360
La Costa Resort & Spa Main Kitchen Carlsbad CA 760-930-7063
Bishop School San Diego CA 858-459-4021 x212
Reata Glen Ladera Ranch CA 949-545-2250
Sbicca Del Mar CA 858-481-1001
Enclave Miramar CA 808-554-4219
Davanti Enoteca India St. San Diego CA
Jeune Et Jolie Carlsbad CA 858-231-0862
Orens Fine Foods San Diego CA 510-910-2298
Paradise Point Resort Tidal San Diego CA 858-490-6363
The Pearl Hotel San Diego CA 877-732-7573
Alila Marea (VAGA Bar) Encinitas CA 805-539-9719
Great Maple Hillcrest San Diego CA 619-255-2282
Madison San Diego CA 619-822-3465
Bol San Diego CA 760-500-0616
Kairoa Brewing Company San Diego CA 858-735-0051
Catania La Jolla La Jolla CA 619-295-3173
University Club San Diego CA 619-234-5200
Ciccia Osteria San Diego CA 619-674-4069
San Diego Yacht Club San Diego CA 619-758-6334
Fernside (Bar) San Diego CA 619-857-9409
Glenbrook Health Center Carlsbad CA 760-704-1000
Rancho Valencia Del Mar CA 858-756-1123
The Farm Golf Club Rancho Santa Fe CA 858-756-5585
Eve-Creations Wellness Encinitas CA 775-450-7235
Mille Fleurs Rancho Santa Fe CA 858-756-3085
Rosewood Kitchen Oceanside CA 760-231-5886
Addison Del Mar Del Mar CA 858-350-7600
Jake's Del Mar Del Mar CA 858-755-2002
The Glen at Scripps Ranch San Diego CA 858-444-8500
Bahia Resort Hotel San Diego CA 858-488-0551
264 Fresco (Kitchen) Carlsbad CA 760-720-3737
San Diego Cellars 2017 San Diego CA 760-207-5324
Shake and Muddle Chula Vista CA 619-816-5429
Home and Away Encinitas Encinitas CA 619-886-1358
La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club San Diego CA 858-454-7126
Gravity Heights Restaurant and Brewery San Diego CA 858-551-5105
Nolita Hall San Diego CA 619-618-8820
Juniper & Ivy Bar San Diego CA 858-481-3666
The Lion Share San Diego CA 619-564-6924
Semola La Jolla CA 858-247-9670
Iron Pig Alehouse San Diego CA 619-885-3718
The Original 40 Brewing San Diego CA 619-206-4725
The Hop Stop Poway CA 858-859-2669
Herb & Wood San Diego CA 520-205-1288
Pacific Regent La Jolla San Diego CA 858-597-8008
Wayfarer Bread La Jolla CA 805-709-0964
Tom Hams Light House San Diego CA 619-291-9110
Cardellino San Diego CA 619-722-3398
Shore Rider La Jolla CA 858-412-5308
The Cork and Craft San Diego CA 858-618-2463
insideOUT San Diego CA 619-888-8623
Wine Vault & Bistro San Diego CA 619-295-3939
Third Corner Ocean Beach San Diego CA 619-223-2700
Del Mar Country Club Rancho Santa Fe CA 858-759-5500 x207
La Costa Glen South Carlsbad CA 760-704-1000
Union Kitchen & Tap (Encinitas) Encinitas CA 760-230-2337
Pendry SD (Provisional) San Diego CA 619-738-7000
Il Dandy San Diego CA 609-373-5917
Miho San Diego CA 619-365-5655


Pickled Beets Martha Stewart.com Pickling was popular during World War II and was considered patriotic for its frugality. Whole pickling spices, bay leaves, white wine, and sugar give these red and golden beets a bright, sweet, relish-like flavor. Yield Makes &hellip Continue reading &rarr

Blood Orange Sorbet Bon Appétit | January 2004 Yield: Makes about 1 quart Regular oranges work just as well, but they won’t impart the same fiery sunset color. Ingredients 4 pounds blood oranges or other oranges 1 1/4 cups water &hellip Continue reading &rarr


Cara Cara Orange and Avocado Salad (or salads, and how to make a good one)

I remember that I should eat salad, and then I react against the idea with the sulky resentment of a teenager.

I go through phases when I dutifully buy bagged baby greens only to pull them out from the crisper drawer, strange and slimy, a few weeks later.

In winter, I&rsquom especially prone to this behavior.

It&rsquos as though I have a sort of selective amnesia about all of the wonderful salads I&rsquove eaten in my life and think I&rsquom going to be chewing on flavorless iceberg lettuce and anemic winter tomatoes with some gloppy bottled dressing poured over the top.

But if I step back a moment and think, I remember salad doesn&rsquot have to be like that.

It can be vibrant and fresh and crisp with bits that are juicy or crunchy or creamy all delicately swathed in a homemade vinaigrette.

One of the great things about being an adult is that I get to make the salad.

In my years of making salads and watching chefs make them at demonstrations and reading serious cookbooks like Thomas Keller&rsquos Ad Hoc at Home with plenty of prescriptive advice on the subject, I&rsquove learned a few secrets that separate the merely decent from the really good.

The first thing is salting the greens and other components before adding the dressing.

The second is dressing the greens lightly and evenly by pouring the vinaigrette along the sides of the bowl rather than into the middle of the greens and then gently tossing them with your hands to get them evenly coated without any heavy soggy bits. You get your hands dirty, but you get your salad right.

The other things are, perhaps, obvious. But I started liking salad so much more when I started making my own vinaigrette.

I grew up with bottled dressings and never knew how simple and easy it is to throw together a basic one that tastes a million times better than anything you can buy.

Just whisk together a little vinegar, dijon, and good olive oil with a sprinkle of salt. (I especially like a vinaigrette with finely minced shallots where the shallots spend a while soaking in the vinegar before everything else gets added to take away that bitey quality.)

Still, even with as easy as that is, I find I eat more salads if I make a big batch of vinaigrette and keep it in a mason jar in the refrigerator so that it&rsquos there when I need it.

And of course, salads are best with really fresh, perfectly ripe produce, because there&rsquos no place for limp and bruised bits to hide.

This cara cara orange and avocado salad is currently my favorite winter salad.

It relies on a mix of sturdy chicories&ndashescarole, radicchio, and endive&ndashto give it a crisp and colorful base.

Then some shaved fennel goes in for texture and to serve as bridge between the sweet oranges and bitter greens. (The textures here are similar to this citrus, avocado, and shaved fennel salad which has more of an Asian-inspired flavor profile and none of the bitter greens.)

Then sweet and juicy cara cara oranges supremes and thinly sliced creamy avocado and crunchy toasted pecans go in. It all gets tossed in a simple shallot and red wine vinaigrette and some extra salt and freshly cracked pepper.

It&rsquos got a great balance of crisp and creamy, sweet and bitter and salty, and its vivid color palette makes it a feast for the eyes as well.

It&rsquos enough to remind me that I really like salad. In fact, it&rsquos a little tough to stop eating this one.


Thank you!

Contact us at [email protected]

Why they&rsquore good for you: While this tropical fruit is an American favorite, bananas are actually classified as an herb, and the correct name of a &ldquobunch&rdquo of bananas is a &ldquohand.&rdquo Technicalities aside, bananas are an excellent source of cardioprotective potassium. They&rsquore an effective prebiotic, enhancing the body&rsquos ability to absorb calcium, and they increase dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin &ndash brain chemicals that counter depression.

Serving size: one medium banana

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 105
Fat: 0.4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 1 mg
Carbohydrates: 27 g
Dietary fiber: 3 g
Sugars: 14 g
Protein: 1.3 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Citrusy Banana-Oat Smoothie
Ingredients
2/3 cup fresh orange juice
1/2 cup prepared quick-cooking oats
1/2 cup plain
2% reduced-fat Greek yogurt
1 tablespoon flaxseed meal
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 teaspoon grated orange rind
1 large banana, sliced and frozen
1 cup ice cubes

Preparation
Combine first 7 ingredients in a blender pulse to combine. Add ice process until smooth.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Raspberries come in gold, black and purple varieties, but red are the most common. Research suggests eating raspberries may help prevent illness by inhibiting abnormal division of cells, and promoting normal healthy cell death. Raspberries are also a rich source of the flavonoids quercetin and gallic acid, which have been shown to boost heart health and prevent obesity and age-related decline.

Serving size: one cup of raspberries

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 64
Fat: 0.8 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 1 mg
Carbohydrates: 14.7 g
Dietary fiber: 8 g
Sugars: 5.4 g
Protein: 1.5 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Raspberry and Blue Cheese Salad
Ingredients
1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
5 cups mixed baby greens
1/2 cup raspberries
1/4 cup chopped toasted pecans
1 ounce blue cheese

Preparation
Combine olive oil, vinegar, Dijon mustard, salt, and pepper. Add mixed baby greens toss. Top with raspberries, pecans, and blue cheese.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Oranges are one of the most potent vitamin C sources and are essential for disarming free-radicals, protecting cells, and sustaining a healthy immune system. Oranges contain a powerful flavonoid molecule called herperidin found in the white pith and peel. In animal studies, herperidin has been shown to lower cholesterol and high blood pressure. So don&rsquot peel all the pith from your orange. Consider adding zest from the skin into your oatmeal for a dose of flavor and health.

Serving size: one large orange

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 86
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 0 mg
Carbohydrates: 21.6 g
Dietary fiber: 4.4 g
Sugars: 17.2 g
Protein: 1.7 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Avocado and Orange Salad
Ingredients
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1 orange
1/2 cup halved grape tomatoes
1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion
1 cup sliced avocado

Preparation
Combine garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and kosher salt in a medium bowl. Peel and section orange squeeze membranes to extract juice into bowl. Stir garlic mixture with a whisk. Add orange sections, grape tomatoes, onion, and avocado to garlic mixture toss gently.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Ounce for ounce, this fuzzy fruit&mdashtechnically a berry&mdashhas more vitamin C than an orange. It also contains vitamin E and an array of polyphenols, offering a high amount of antioxidant protection. Fiber, potassium, magnesium and zinc&mdashpartly responsible for healthy hair, skin and nails&mdashare also wrapped up in this nutritious fruit.

Serving size: one kiwi

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 42
Fat: 0.4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 2 mg
Carbohydrates: 10 g
Dietary fiber: 2 g
Sugars: 6 g
Protein: 0.8 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Shrimp and Kiwi Salad
Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil, divided
12 peeled and deveined large shrimp (about 3/4 pound)
1 tablespoon chopped green onions
1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon grated lime rind
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
2 cups torn red leaf lettuce leaves
1 cup cubed peeled kiwifruit (about 3 kiwifruit)

Preparation
Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add shrimp sauté 4 minutes or until done. Remove from heat.

Combine 2 teaspoons oil, onions, and next 7 ingredients (onions through black pepper) in a bowl. Add shrimp toss to coat. Spoon mixture over lettuce top with kiwi.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Pomegranates tend to have more vitamin C and potassium and fewer calories than other fruits. A serving provides nearly 50% of a day&rsquos worth of vitamin C and powerful polyphenols, which may help reduce cancer risk.

Serving size: one cup of pomegranate seeds

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 144
Fat: 2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 5 mg
Carbohydrates: g
Dietary fiber: 7 g
Sugars: 23.8 g
Protein: 3 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Pomegranate and Pear Jam
Ingredients
2 cups sugar
2 cups chopped, peeled Seckel (or other) pear
2/3 cup strained fresh pomegranate juice (about 2 pomegranates)
1/4 cup rose wine
1/4 cup pomegranate seeds
1/2 teaspoon butter
2 tablespoons fruit pectin for less- or no-sugar recipes (such as Sure-Jell in pink box)
1 tablespoon grated lemon rind
1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary

Preparation
Combine sugar, pear, pomegranate juice, and wine in a large saucepan over medium heat stir until sugar melts. Bring to a simmer simmer 25 minutes or until pear is tender. Remove from heat mash with a potato masher. Add pomegranate seeds and butter bring to a boil. Stir in fruit pectin. Return mixture to a boil cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat stir in lemon rind and rosemary. Cool to room temperature. Cover and chill overnight.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Blueberries are rich in a natural plant chemical called anthocyanin which gives these berries their namesake color. Blueberries may help protect vision, lower blood sugar levels and keep the mind sharp by improving memory and cognition.

Serving size: one cup of blueberries

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 84
Fat: 0.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 1 mg
Carbohydrates: 21.5 g
Dietary fiber: 3.6 g
Sugars: 14.7 g
Protein: 1 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Lemon-Blueberry with Mascarpone Oatmeal
Ingredients
3/4 cup water
1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
Dash of salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon prepared lemon curd
3 tablespoons fresh blueberries
1 teaspoon mascarpone cheese
2 teaspoons sliced toasted almonds

Preparation
Bring water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Stir in oats and dash of salt. Reduce heat simmer 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat, and stir in sugar and lemon curd. Top oatmeal with blueberries, mascarpone cheese, and almonds.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Grapefruit may not be heralded as a &ldquosuperfruit,&rdquo but it should be. Available in white, pink, yellow and red varieties, grapefruit is low in calories and loaded with nutrients, supporting weight loss, clear skin, digestive balance, increased energy and heart and cancer prevention.

Serving size: one large grapefruit

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 53
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 0 mg
Carbohydrates: 13.4 g
Dietary fiber: 1.8 g
Sugars: 11.6 g
Protein: 1 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Grilled Mahimahi with Peach and Pink Grapefruit Relish
Ingredients
1/3 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
2 1/2 cups diced peeled ripe peaches (about 1 1/2 pounds)
1 1/2 cups pink grapefruit sections (about 2 large grapefruit)
1/2 cup small mint leaves
3/4 teaspoon salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon black pepper, divided
6 (6-ounce) mahimahi or other firm whitefish fillets (about 3/4 inch thick)

Preparation
Prepare grill.

Place vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Place onion in a large bowl. Pour vinegar mixture over onion, tossing to coat cool. Add peaches, grapefruit, mint, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper to onion toss gently.

Sprinkle fish with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Place fish on grill rack coated with cooking spray grill 5 minutes on each side or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.

Why they&rsquore good for you: A tangerine has more antioxidants than an orange, and this powerful little fruit is full of soluble and insoluble fiber that play a role in reducing disease risk and supporting weight management. Tangerines are a good source of lutein and zeaxanthin, which help lower the risk of chronic eye diseases like cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Animal studies have suggested that flavonoids found in tangerines may be protective against type 2 diabetes and heart disease, so use the zest on fruit and vegetables to reap the benefits of the fruit&rsquos natural oils.

Serving size: one small tangerine

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 40
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 2 mg
Carbohydrates: 10 g
Dietary fiber: 1.4 g
Sugars: 8 g
Protein: 0.6 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Tangerine and Avocado Salad with Pumpkin Seeds
Ingredients
2 tangerines, peeled
1 small avocado, peeled and sliced
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoons toasted pumpkin seeds
1/4 teaspoon chili powder
Dash of kosher salt

Preparation
Cut tangerines into rounds. Combine tangerines, avocado, lime juice, and olive oil toss gently to coat. Sprinkle with pumpkin seeds, chili powder, and a dash of kosher salt.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Avocados contain nearly 20 vitamins and minerals, many of which are easily absorbed by the body. Simply substituting one avocado for a source of saturated fat (such as butter or full fat cheese) may reduce your risk of heart disease, even without weight loss.

Serving size: one avocado

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 322
Fat: 29.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 14 mg
Carbohydrates: 17 g
Dietary fiber: 13.5 g
Sugars: 1 g
Protein: 4 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Chipotle Pork and Avocado Wrap
Ingredients
1/2 cup mashed peeled avocado
1 1/2 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise
1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons chopped canned chipotle chiles in adobo sauce
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
4 (8-inch) fat-free flour tortillas
1 1/2 cups (1/4-inch-thick) slices cut Simply Roasted Pork (about 8 ounces)
1 cup shredded iceberg lettuce
1/4 cup bottled salsa

Preparation
Combine the first 7 ingredients, stirring well.

Warm tortillas according to package directions. Spread about 2 tablespoons avocado mixture over each tortilla, leaving a 1-inch border. Arrange Simply Roasted Pork slices down center of tortillas. Top each tortilla with 1/4 cup shredded lettuce and 1 tablespoon salsa, and roll up.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Tomatoes are a nutritional powerhouse. They&rsquore rich in lycopene, a potent weapon against cancer. As one of the carotenoid phytochemicals (related to beta-carotene), lycopene appears to protect our cells&rsquo DNA with its strong antioxidant power. Lycopene has also shown the ability to stimulate enzymes that deactivate carcinogens.

Serving size: one medium tomato

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 22
Fat: 0.25 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 6 mg
Carbohydrates: 4.8 g
Dietary fiber: 1.5 g
Sugars: 3.2 g
Protein: 1.1 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Tomato-Basil Soup
Ingredients
2 teaspoons olive oil
3 garlic cloves, minced
3 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 (14.5-ounce) cans no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
2 cups fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced
Basil leaves (optional)

Preparation
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Stir in the broth, salt, and tomatoes bring to a boil. Reduce heat simmer 20 minutes. Stir in basil.

Place half of the soup in a blender process until smooth. Pour pureed soup into a bowl, and repeat procedure with remaining soup. Garnish with basil leaves, if desired.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Deep-purple eggplant is classified as a nightshade vegetable, kin to the tomato and bell pepper. Purple foods can be a powerful weapon in fighting heart disease since they&rsquore a rich source of phytonutrients&mdashnaturally occurring plant chemicals that have disease-protecting capabilities. One in particular, chlorogenic acid, is one of the most potent free radical scavengers found in plant tissues.

Serving size: one cup cooked eggplant

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 35
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 1 mg
Carbohydrates: 8.6 g
Dietary fiber: 2.5 g
Sugars: 3 g
Protein: 0.8 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Barley Risotto with Eggplant and Tomatoes
Ingredients
6 cups (1/2-inch) diced eggplant
1 pint cherry tomatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1/2 teaspoon black pepper, divided
5 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
2 cups water
1 1/2 cups finely chopped onion
1 cup uncooked pearl barley
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup (2 ounces) crumbled soft goat cheese
1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil
1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted

Preparations
Preheat oven to 400°.

Combine eggplant, tomatoes, 2 tablespoons oil, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a bowl toss to coat. Arrange mixture in a single layer on a jelly-roll pan. Bake at 400° for 20 minutes or until tomatoes begin to collapse and eggplant is tender.

Combine broth and 2 cups water in a medium saucepan bring to a simmer (do not boil). Keep warm over low heat.

Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion to pan sauté 4 minutes or until onion begins to brown. Stir in barley and garlic cook 1 minute. Add wine cook 1 minute or until liquid almost evaporates, stirring constantly. Add 1 cup broth mixture to pan bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Cook 5 minutes or until liquid is nearly absorbed, stirring constantly. Add remaining broth mixture, 1 cup at a time, stirring constantly until each portion of broth mixture is absorbed before adding the next (about 40 minutes total). Gently stir in eggplant mixture, remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and salt. Top with cheese, basil, and nuts.

Why it&rsquos good for you: When it comes to nutrition, this is no lightweight. Swiss chard contains betalains (also found in beets), vitamins A, C , E and K, magnesium, potassium, fiber, calcium, choline, a host of B vitamins, zinc and selenium.

Serving size: one cup of raw swiss chard

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 7
Fat: 0.07 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 77 mg
Carbohydrates: 1.4 g
Dietary fiber: 0.6 g
Sugars: 0.4 g
Protein: 0.7 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Swiss Chard with Onions
Ingredients
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 cups thinly sliced onion
8 cups torn Swiss chard (about 12 ounces)
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Preparation
Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion sauté 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Add chard stir-fry 10 minutes or until wilted. Stir in Worcestershire, salt, and pepper.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Mushrooms are a rich source of ergothioneine, an antioxidant that may help fight cancer. Mushrooms are also a source of riboflavin, a vitamin that supports the body’s natural detoxification mechanisms. They are the highest vegan source of vitamin D.

Serving size: one cup of raw mushrooms

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 15
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 4 mg
Carbohydrates: 2.3 g
Dietary fiber: 0.7 g
Sugars: 1.4 g
Protein: 2 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Penne with Sage and Mushrooms
Ingredients
1 whole garlic head
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon olive oil
2 1/2 cups boiling water, divided
1/2 ounce dried wild mushroom blend (about 3/4 cup)
8 ounces uncooked 100 percent whole-grain penne pasta
1/4 cup fresh sage leaves
2 1/2 cups sliced cremini mushrooms (about 6 ounces)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup fat-free, lower-sodium chicken broth
2 ounces fresh Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, divided

Preparation
Preheat oven to 400°.

Cut top off garlic head. Place in a small baking dish, and drizzle with 1 teaspoon oil cover with foil, and bake at 400° for 45 minutes. Remove dish from oven. Add 1/2 cup boiling water to dish cover and let stand 30 minutes. Separate cloves squeeze to extract garlic pulp into water. Discard skins. Mash garlic pulp mixture with a fork, and set aside.

Combine remaining 2 cups boiling water and dried mushrooms in a bowl cover and let stand 30 minutes. Rinse mushrooms drain well, and roughly chop. Set aside.

Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat.

Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add sage to pan sauté 1 minute or until crisp and browned. Remove from pan using a slotted spoon set aside. Add cremini mushrooms, salt, and pepper to pan sauté 4 minutes. Add garlic mixture, chopped mushrooms, and broth to pan cook 5 minutes or until liquid is reduced by about half. Grate 1 1/2 ounces cheese. Stir pasta and grated cheese into pan cover and let stand 5 minutes. Thinly shave remaining 1/2 ounce cheese top each serving evenly with cheese shavings and sage leaves.

Why it&rsquos good for you: This dark green leafy vegetable is akin to Mother Nature&rsquos sunglasses. Rich in the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, kale delivers these pigments to the retina which absorb the sun&rsquos damaging rays. Nutrients in kale have also been shown to lower cancer risk, support bone health and aid in natural detoxification.

Serving size: one cup of raw kale

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 8
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 6 mg
Carbohydrates: 1 g
Dietary fiber: 0.6 g
Sugars: 0.4 g
Protein: 0.7 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Wilted Kale with Golden Shallots
Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 sliced shallots
8 cups lacinato kale, stemmed and chopped
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2/3 cup unsalted chicken stock

Preparation
Heat a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add olive oil swirl to coat. Add sliced shallots cook 5 minutes or until golden, stirring frequently. Add kale, salt, and pepper to pan cook 2 minutes. Add chicken stock cover and cook 4 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Our skin, lungs, kidneys and liver are constantly detoxifying, but it&rsquos nice to lend a helping hand. Eating broccoli sprouts, which look similar to alfalfa, may do just that. Rich in natural plant chemicals, broccoli sprouts may have cancer-fighting and antioxidant capabilities that help our cells protect us from disease.

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 10
Fat: 0 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 0 mg
Carbohydrates: 1 g
Dietary fiber: 1 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 1 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Seared Tofu with Gingered Vegetables and Broccoli Sprouts
Ingredients
1 cup broccoli sprouts
1 pound reduced-fat extra firm tofu
1 (3 1/2-ounce) bag boil-in-bag long-grain rice
3/4 teaspoon salt, divided
1 tablespoon dark sesame oil, divided
1 tablespoon bottled minced garlic
1 tablespoon bottled ground fresh ginger (such as Spice World)
1 large red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 cup sliced green onions, divided
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
Cooking spray
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

Preparation
Place tofu on several layers of paper towels let stand 10 minutes. Cut tofu into 1-inch cubes.

Prepare rice according to package directions, omitting salt and fat. Add 1/4 teaspoon salt to rice fluff with a fork.

Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic, ginger, and bell pepper to pan sauté for 3 minutes. Stir in 3/4 cup onions, vinegar, and soy sauce cook for 30 seconds. Remove from pan. Wipe skillet with paper towels recoat pan with cooking spray.

Place pan over medium-high heat. Sprinkle tofu with remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and black pepper. Add tofu to pan cook 8 minutes or until golden, turning to brown on all sides. Return bell pepper mixture to pan, and cook 1 minute or until thoroughly heated. Drizzle tofu mixture with remaining 1 teaspoon oil top with sesame seeds. Serve tofu mixture with rice top with sprouts and remaining 1/4 cup onions.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Fennel is a vitamin cocktail, providing antioxidants, vitamin C, fiber, and a unique mix of phytonutrients. One such phytonutrient is called anethole which, in animal studies, has been shown to reduce inflammation and fend off chronic disease.

Serving size: one bulb of fennel

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 73
Fat: 0.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 122 mg
Carbohydrates: 17 g
Dietary fiber: g
Sugars: 9 g
Protein: 3 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Fennel Slaw with Orange Vinaigrette
Ingredients
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon grated orange rind
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
3 medium fennel bulbs with stalks (about 4 pounds)
2 cups orange sections (about 2 large oranges)
1/2 cup coarsely chopped pitted green olives

Preparations
Combine the first 7 ingredients in a large bowl.

Trim tough outer leaves from fennel mince feathery fronds to measure 1 cup. Remove and discard stalks. Cut fennel bulb in half lengthwise discard core. Thinly slice bulbs. Add fronds, fennel slices, and orange sections to bowl toss gently to combine. Sprinkle with olives.

Why it&rsquos good for you: This pungent little allium has serious health merits, packing both flavonoids and sulfur-containing nutrients that bolster immunity and support healthy joints. It’s well-known for its cardioprotective benefits, and garlic is also an effective antiviral.

Serving size: one clove

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 4
Fat: 0.02 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 1 mg
Carbohydrates: 1 g
Dietary fiber: 0.1 g
Sugars: 0.03 g
Protein: 0.2 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Garlic-and-Herb Oven-Fried Halibut
Ingredients
1 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1 large garlic clove, minced
2 large egg whites, lightly beaten
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
6 (6-ounce) halibut fillets
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Cooking spray

Preparation
Preheat oven to 450°.

Combine first 5 ingredients in a shallow dish. Place egg whites and egg in a shallow dish. Place flour in a shallow dish. Sprinkle fish with salt and pepper. Dredge fish in flour. Dip in egg mixture dredge in panko mixture.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 3 fish fillets cook 2 1/2 minutes on each side or until browned. Place fish on a broiler pan coated with cooking spray. Repeat procedure with remaining 1 tablespoon oil and remaining fish. Bake at 450° for 6 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork or until desired degree of doneness.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Even though sweet potatoes have a bit more natural sugar than white potatoes, they are a mighty orange package of nutrients. A large sweet potato contains more than a day&rsquos worth of vitamin A, essential for eyesight and reproductive health. It also has B vitamins, fiber and potassium and an antioxidant called glutathione, which may enhance immunity and supports metabolism.

Serving size: one medium cooked sweet potato

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 103
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 41 mg
Carbohydrates: 23.7 g
Dietary fiber: 3.8 g
Sugars: 7.4 g
Protein: 2.3 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Spicy Grilled Sweet Potatoes
Ingredients
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound peeled sweet potatoes, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
Cooking spray
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

Preparation
Combine the first 4 ingredients in a small bowl.

Combine oil and sweet potatoes in a medium bowl toss to coat. Heat a large grill pan coated with cooking spray over medium heat. Add potatoes, and cook for 10 minutes, turning occasionally. Place potatoes in a large bowl sprinkle with cumin mixture and cilantro. Toss gently.

Why they&rsquore good for you: It’s hard to beat beets. Research shows they&rsquore a good source of antioxidants and have compounds that can help lower blood pressure and LDL cholesterol. They also look lovely on your plate thanks to betalains&mdashthe pigment that gives them their color. Betalains are destroyed by heat, so steam beets or roast them for less than an hour to derive maximum nutrition benefits.

Serving size: one cup of cooked beets

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 37
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 65 mg
Carbohydrates: 8.5 g
Dietary fiber: 2 g
Sugars: 7 g
Protein: 1.4 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Roasted Beet and Shallot Salad over Wilted Beet Greens and Arugula
Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds beets
8 shallots, peeled and halved
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon grated orange rind
2 teaspoons olive oil, divided
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
1 teaspoon sugar
2 teaspoons cider vinegar
5 cups trimmed arugula (about 5 ounces)
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts, toasted

Preparation
Preheat oven to 425°.

Trim beets, reserving greens. Wrap beets in foil. Place beets and shallots on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Coat shallots with cooking spray. Bake at 425° for 25 minutes or until shallots are lightly browned. Remove shallots from pan. Return beets to oven bake an additional 35 minutes or until beets are tender. Cool. Peel beets cut into 1/2-inch wedges. Place beets, shallots, vinegar, rind, 1 teaspoon oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a large bowl toss well.

Heat remaining 1 teaspoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add reserved beet greens to pan sauté 1 minute or until greens begin to wilt. Stir in sugar, cider, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Remove pan from heat. Add arugula stir just until wilted. Place about 1 cup greens mixture on each of 4 plates. Sprinkle each serving with 1 1/2 teaspoons walnuts top each serving with 3/4 cup beet mixture.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Spinach is among the top greens for folate, and contains high amounts of vitamin A, iron, potassium, calcium, zinc and selenium which offers antioxidant protection and supports thyroid function.

Serving size: one cup of raw spinach

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 7
Fat: 0.4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 24 mg
Carbohydrates: 1 g
Dietary fiber: 0.7 g
Sugars: 0.1 g
Protein: 1 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Spinach-and-Grapefruit Salad
Ingredients
2 tablespoons chopped pecans
8 cups torn spinach
2 cups red grapefruit sections (about 3 medium grapefruit)
2 cups sliced mushrooms (about 8 ounces)
1/4 cup (1 ounce) crumbled blue cheese
1/2 cup raspberry fat-free vinaigrette (such as Girard’s)

Preparation
Place the pecans in a large skillet, and cook over medium heat 3 minutes or until lightly browned, shaking skillet frequently. Set aside.

Place 2 cups spinach on each of 4 serving plates. Arrange 1/2 cup grapefruit and 1/2 cup mushrooms over spinach. Sprinkle each serving with 1 tablespoon cheese and 1 1/2 teaspoons pecans drizzle each with 2 tablespoons vinaigrette.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Cauliflower, which is found in white, purple, green and orange varieties, is a cancer-fighting powerhouse and supports our body&rsquos natural detoxification process. It&rsquos rich in an assortment of phytonutrients that reduce oxidative stress in our cells. Interestingly, research has shown that cauliflower combined with turmeric have have potential in preventing and treating prostate cancer.

Serving size: one cup of chopped raw cauliflower

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 27
Fat: 0.3 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 32 mg
Carbohydrates: g
Dietary fiber: 2 g
Sugars: 2 g
Protein: 2 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Roasted Cauliflower
Ingredients
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium onions, quartered
5 garlic cloves, halved
4 cups cauliflower florets (about 1 1/2 pounds)
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon water
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preparation
Preheat oven to 500°.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and garlic cook 5 minutes or until browned, stirring frequently. Remove from heat.

Place onion mixture and cauliflower in a roasting pan coated with cooking spray. Combine water and mustard pour over vegetable mixture. Toss to coat sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake at 500° for 20 minutes or until golden brown, stirring occasionally. Sprinkle with parsley.

Why they&rsquore good for you: A sister to broccoli and Brussels sprouts, collards are considered a cruciferous vegetable. Cooked collards are effective at lowering cholesterol&mdashmore so than even kale&mdashas well as fighting cancer. Just one-half cup of collard greens contains two-days&rsquo worth of vitamin A, essential for healthy vision, teeth and skin.

Serving size: one cup cooked collard greens

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 63
Fat: 1.4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 28 mg
Carbohydrates: 10.7 g
Dietary fiber: 7.6 g
Sugars: 0.8 g
Protein: 5.2 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Stewed Collards
Ingredients
Cooking spray
1 cup vertically sliced onion
8 cups chopped collard greens
2 cups unsalted chicken stock
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons cider vinegar

Preparation
Heat a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add onion sauté 3 minutes. Add collard greens, chicken stock, sugar, and salt. Cover bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low simmer 20 minutes or until very tender. Stir in vinegar.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Alliums like onions are rich in healthy, sulfur-containing compounds which are also responsible for their pungent smell. Onions are good sources of vitamins C and B6, manganese, potassium and fiber. They&rsquore also a superb source of the antioxidant quercetin. While research is inconclusive, quercetin is suspected of supporting heart health, combating inflammation and reducing allergy symptoms.

Serving size: one cup of cooked onions

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 92
Fat: 0.4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 3 mg
Carbohydrates: 21 g
Dietary fiber: 3 g
Sugars: 10 g
Protein: 3 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Patty Melts with Grilled Onions
Ingredients
8 (1/8-inch-thick) slices Vidalia or other sweet onion
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
Cooking spray
1 pound extra-lean ground beef
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons creamy mustard blend (such as Dijonnaise)
8 (1-ounce) slices rye bread
1 cup (4 ounces) shredded reduced-fat Jarlsberg cheese

Preparation
Arrange onion slices on a plate. Drizzle vinegar over onion slices. Heat a large grill pan over medium heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add onion to pan cover and cook 3 minutes on each side. Remove from pan cover and keep warm.

Heat pan over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Divide beef into 4 equal portions, shaping each into a 1/2-inch-thick patty. Sprinkle patties evenly with salt and pepper. Add patties to pan cook 3 minutes on each side or until done.

Spread about 1 teaspoon mustard blend over 4 bread slices layer each slice with 2 tablespoons cheese, 1 patty, 2 onion slices, and 2 tablespoons cheese. Spread about 1 teaspoon mustard blend over remaining bread slices place, mustard side down, on top of sandwiches.

Heat pan over medium heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add sandwiches to pan. Place a cast-iron or other heavy skillet on top of sandwiches press gently to flatten. Cook 3 minutes on each side or until bread is toasted (leave cast-iron skillet on sandwiches while they cook).

Why it&rsquos good for you: Winter squash is an inexpensive vegetable that&rsquos as healthy as it is versatile. It&rsquos one of the richest sources of plant-based anti-inflammatory beta-carotene, which can support healthy vision and cell development. Its yellow-orange flesh is also infection protective, and may even reduce age-associated illnesses.

Serving size: one cup of cooked winter squash

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 180
Fat: 0.2 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 8 mg
Carbohydrates: g
Dietary fiber: 6.6 g
Sugars: 4 g
Protein: 1.8 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Pasta with Winter Squash and Pine Nuts
Ingredients
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 garlic clove, minced
2 1/2 cups water, divided
1 pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and shredded
1 teaspoon sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
12 ounces uncooked penne (tube-shaped pasta)
1 cup (4 ounces) finely shredded Parmesan cheese, divided

Preparation
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until lightly browned. Add pine nuts and sage remove from heat. Remove from pan, and set aside.

Heat olive oil in pan over medium-high heat. Add garlic to pan, and sauté 30 seconds. Reduce heat to medium. Add 1 cup water and squash to pan. Cook for 12 minutes or until water is absorbed, stirring occasionally. Add remaining water, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring occasionally until each portion of water is absorbed before adding the next (about 15 minutes). Stir in sugar, salt, and pepper.

Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat. Drain, reserving 1/2 cup pasta water. Combine pasta and squash mixture in a large bowl. Add reserved 1/2 cup pasta water, butter mixture, and 3/4 cup cheese toss well. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup cheese. Serve immediately.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Experts recommend the general population, as well as pregnant and breastfeeding women, eat 8 to 12 ounces of seafood weekly to boost brain health and avoid the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Choosing fish rich in essential Omega-3 fatty acids like tuna&ndashand even canned tuna&ndashcan promote immunity, heart health and may even lessen postpartum depression. Don’t go overboard, though&mdashtuna can be high in mercury.

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 93
Fat: 0.4 g
Cholesterol: 33 mg
Sodium: 38 mg
Carbohydrates: 0 g
Dietary fiber: 0 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 20.7 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Arugula, Italian Tuna, and White Bean Salad
Ingredients
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 cup grape tomatoes, halved
1 cup thinly vertically sliced red onion
2 (6-ounce) cans Italian tuna packed in olive oil, drained and broken into chunks$
1 (15-ounce) can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
1 (5-ounce) package fresh baby arugula
2 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, shaved

Preparation
Whisk together first 6 ingredients in a large bowl. Add tomatoes and next 4 ingredients (through arugula) toss. Top with cheese.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Sardines are tiny but mighty, rivaling salmon when it comes to omega-3 fatty acid content. These fatty acids go to work immediately (as opposed to plant-based omega 3s), improving blood flow, feeding our brain, stabilizing heart rhythms and keeping inflammation in check. Sardines are also a source of calcium. Look for the varieties packed in olive oil for an added heart-health benefit.

Serving size: one can

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 191
Fat: 10.5 g
Cholesterol: 131 mg
Sodium: 282 mg
Carbohydrates: 0 g
Dietary fiber: 0 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 22.7 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Fennel-Sardine Spaghetti
Ingredients
8 ounces uncooked spaghetti
1 medium fennel bulb (about 8 ounces)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup prechopped onion
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 cup tomato sauce
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 (15-ounce) can sardines in tomato sauce, undrained

Preparation
Cook pasta according to package directions drain.

Trim outer leaves from fennel. Chop fronds to measure 1/2 cup. Discard stalks. Cut bulb in half lengthwise discard core. Thinly slice bulb.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add sliced fennel and onion sauté 4 minutes. Add garlic sauté 20 seconds. Stir in tomato sauce, oregano, red pepper, and sauce from sardines. Cover and reduce heat.

Discard backbones from fish. Add fish to pan gently break fish into chunks. Cover and cook 6 minutes. Toss pasta with sauce sprinkle with fronds.

Why they&rsquore good for you: This bite-sized fish shows up in many signature dishes from Italy, Thailand, Spain and Korea. Just three ounces of Anchovies offer 19 grams of protein, as well as B vitamins, calcium, iron and omega-three fatty acids. They’re also low in mercury.

Serving size: five anchovies from a can

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 42
Fat: 2 g
Cholesterol: 38 mg
Sodium: 734 mg
Carbohydrates: 0 g
Dietary fiber: 0 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 5.8 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Spicy Anchovy Broccoli
Ingredients
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
2 teaspoons grated lemon rind
3/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 drained and minced anchovy fillets
4 cups broccoli florets, steamed

Preparation
Heat canola oil, thyme, lemon rind, crushed red pepper, kosher salt, minced garlic, and minced anchovy fillets in a small skillet over medium heat cook 2 minutes or until garlic begins to sizzle. Add steamed broccoli florets toss to coat.

Why it&rsquos good for you: As we age, both intrinsic (our DNA) and extrinsic factors (the sun) take their toll. Skin can become dull, patchy, spotted and wrinkled, and while you might be tempted to go for a fancy face cream, what you eat may bring more potent results. How? Omega-3s in foods like salmon may help reduce dryness (from atopic dermatitis and psoriasis) and may even reduce the risk of skin cancer.

Serving size: 3 oz, cooked

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 175
Fat: 10.5 g
Cholesterol: 54 mg
Sodium: 52 mg
Carbohydrates: 0 g
Dietary fiber: 0 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 18.8 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Margarita Salmon
Ingredients
1 teaspoon grated lime rind
3 tablespoons fresh lime or lemon juice
1 tablespoon tequila
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon grated orange rind
1 garlic clove, crushed
4 (6-ounce) salmon fillets (about 1 inch thick)
8 ounces uncooked angel hair pasta
Cooking spray
Lime slices (optional)

Preparation
Combine first 8 ingredients in a large zip-top plastic bag add fish to bag. Seal and marinate in refrigerator 20 minutes.

While fish is marinating, cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat. Drain and keep warm. Remove fish from bag, reserving marinade.

Place fish on a broiler pan coated with cooking spray broil 7 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, basting occasionally with reserved marinade. Serve over pasta. Garnish with lime slices, if desired.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Light meat is a fine choice, but there&rsquos no reason to be afraid of the dark. The fat in dark meat contains a hormone called cholecystokinin, or CCK, which is partly responsible for satiety, so a little bit of dark meat can go a long way, especially if you&rsquore watching your weight. Further, dark meat contains myoglobin, a protein which delivers oxygen to muscle cells. Dark meat also has more B vitamins than white meat, making it a nutrient-rich protein source that&rsquos tasty and satisfying, and meat from the leg and thigh are rich in taurine. Studies have shown that taurine can lower the risk of coronary heart disease in women and it may also help protect against diabetes and high blood pressure.

Serving size: chicken, dark meat, cooked thigh (one example)

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 184
Fat: 8.7 g
Cholesterol: 137 mg
Sodium: 198 mg
Carbohydrates: 0 g
Dietary fiber: 0 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 27 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Roasted Chicken Thighs Provençal
Ingredients
3 pounds small red potatoes, quartered
4 plum tomatoes, seeded and cut into 6 wedges
3 carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary, divided
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, divided
1 teaspoon salt, divided $
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
6 (6-ounce) skinless chicken thighs
24 niçoise olives
Rosemary sprigs (optional)

Preparation
Preheat oven to 425°.

Place potatoes, tomatoes, and carrots on a jelly-roll pan coated with cooking spray. Drizzle vegetable mixture with olive oil sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary, 1 teaspoon thyme, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Toss gently, and spread into a single layer on pan. Bake at 425° for 30 minutes. Remove vegetable mixture from pan, and keep warm.

Sprinkle chicken with remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped rosemary, remaining 1 teaspoon thyme, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Add chicken and olives to pan. Bake at 425° for 35 minutes or until chicken is done. Garnish with rosemary sprigs, if desired.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Fiber from whole grains can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by nearly 40%, protecting gastrointestinal health. Foods labeled &ldquohigh fiber&rdquo have 5 grams of fiber or more per serving, and the U.S. Dietary guidelines recommend making one-half of your daily grain servings whole. Just remember that the descriptors &ldquowhole grain&rdquo and &ldquomulti-grain&rdquo don&rsquot necessarily mean the product is whole wheat.

Serving size: one slice

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 81
Fat: 1 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 146 mg
Carbohydrates: 13.7 g
Dietary fiber: 2 g
Sugars: 1 g
Protein: 4 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Whole-Wheat Orange Juice Muffins
Ingredients
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup orange juice
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon rind
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1/2 cup golden raisins
Cooking spray

Preparation
Preheat oven to 400°.

Lightly spoon flours into dry measuring cups level with a knife. Combine all-purpose flour and next 5 ingredients (all-purpose flour through cinnamon) in a medium bowl stir well with a whisk. Make a well in center of mixture. Combine juice, oil, rind, and egg add to flour mixture, stirring just until moist. Stir in raisins. Spoon batter into 12 muffin cups coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle evenly with 1 tablespoon sugar. Bake at 400° for 20 minutes or until muffins spring back when touched lightly in center. Remove from pan. Cool completely on a wire rack.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Quinoa is actually a seed, rich in amino acids. Just one serving provides all 9 essential amino acids, making it a good protein source for vegetarians. It also supplies anti-inflammatory phytonutrients and heart-healthy monounsaturated fatty acids, as well as vitamin E, zinc, folate and phosphorus.

Serving size: one cup, cooked

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 222
Fat: 3.6 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 13 mg
Carbohydrates: 39.4 g
Dietary fiber: 5 g
Sugars: 1.6 g
Protein: 8 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Nutty Almond-Sesame Red Quinoa
Ingredients
1 2/3 cups water
1 cup red quinoa
1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 teaspoons dark sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3 green onions, thinly sliced

Preparation
Bring 1 2/3 cups water and quinoa to a boil in a medium saucepan. Reduce heat to low, and simmer 12 minutes or until quinoa is tender drain. Stir in almonds, juice, oils, salt, and onions.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Hemp seed won&rsquot get you high, but it can make you healthier. A seed from the cannabis sativa plant, this food contains easily digestible protein, all nine essential amino acids (just like flax), plus fatty acids, vitamin E and trace minerals. The seeds taste a bit like pine nuts.

Serving size: three tablespoons

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 170
Fat: 13 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: mg
Carbohydrates: g
Dietary fiber: g
Sugars: g
Protein: g

Recipe: Add a handful to smoothies, salads or oatmeal

Why they&rsquore good for you: This hearty cereal grain is rich in a type of fiber called beta-glucan which has powerful, antimicrobial capabilities that boost immunity and lower cholesterol. The antioxidants in oats make this grain cardioprotective, plus they have the ability to stabilize blood sugar levels, lower diabetes risk and reduce the risk of certain cancers.

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 160
Fat: 2.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: mg
Carbohydrates: 27 g
Dietary fiber: 4 g
Sugars: 1 g
Protein: 5 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Cherry-Hazelnut Oatmeal
Ingredients
6 cups water
2 cups steel-cut oats (such as McCann’s)
2/3 cup dried Bing or other sweet cherries, coarsely chopped
1/4 teaspoon salt
5 tablespoons brown sugar, divided
1/4 cup chopped hazelnuts, toasted and divided
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons toasted hazelnut oil

Preparation
Combine the first 4 ingredients in a medium saucepan bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until desired consistency, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat. Stir in 3 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon nuts, and cinnamon. Place 1 cup oatmeal in each of 6 bowls sprinkle each serving with 1 teaspoon sugar. Top each serving with 1 1/2 teaspoon nuts drizzle with 1 teaspoon oil.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Kamut is an ancient grain whose true origin isn&rsquot clear. It looks like brown Basmati rice, but it has a more buttery, nutty and sweeter flavor. Kamut has 40% more protein than durum (traditional) wheat, and contains an array of polyphenols and vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and thiamin.

Serving size: one cup, cooked

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 227
Fat: 1.4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 14 mg
Carbohydrates: 47.5 g
Dietary fiber: 7 g
Sugars: 5.3 g
Protein: 10 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Kamut, Lentil, and Chickpea Soup
Ingredients
3/4 cup kamut berries, rinsed
2 cups boiling water
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups finely chopped onion
1 cup finely chopped carrot
3/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup thinly sliced celery
1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 (14 1/2-ounce) cans fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
2 bay leaves
1/3 cup dried lentils
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained
2 teaspoons chopped celery leaves (optional)

Preparation
Place kamut in a small bowl. Carefully pour boiling water over kamut. Let stand 30 minutes drain.

Heat oil in a stockpot over medium heat. Add onion, parsley, celery, tarragon, and thyme cook 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add garlic cook 2 minutes, stirring often.

Add kamut, broth, and bay leaves to onion mixture bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 30 minutes. Add lentils and pepper cook 20 minutes or until lentils are tender. Discard bay leaves. Add chickpeas simmer 2 minutes. Garnish with celery leaves, if desired.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Lentils should be part of everyone&rsquos diet, packing 18 grams of protein, 16 grams of fiber, and less than 1 gram of fat per cup. They contain nearly 30 percent more folate than spinach and they&rsquore a source of zinc and B vitamins. Enjoying lentils can help guard against heart disease and stabilize blood sugar. Thanks to its iron content, lentils can support and maintain metabolism.

Serving size: one cup, cooked

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 230
Fat: 0.75 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 4 mg
Carbohydrates: 40 g
Dietary fiber: 1 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 1 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Lentils with Wine-Glazed Winter Vegetables
Ingredients
3 cups water
1 1/2 cups dried lentils
1 teaspoon salt, divided
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil
2 cups chopped onion
1 1/2 cups chopped peeled celeriac (celery root)
1 cup diced parsnip
1 cup diced carrot
1 tablespoon minced fresh or 1 teaspoon dried tarragon, divided
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 garlic clove, minced
2/3 cup dry red wine
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon butter
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Preparation
Combine water, lentils, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and bay leaf in a medium saucepan bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 25 minutes. Remove lentils from heat, and set aside.

Heat olive oil in a medium cast-iron or nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion, celeriac, parsnip, carrot, and 1 1/2 teaspoons tarragon, and sauté 10 minutes or until browned. Stir in 1/2 teaspoon salt, tomato paste, and garlic cook mixture 1 minute. Stir in wine, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Bring to a boil cover, reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Stir in mustard. Add lentil mixture, and cook 2 minutes. Remove from heat discard bay leaf, and stir in butter, 1 1/2 teaspoons tarragon, and pepper.

Why it&rsquos good for you: Farro is an ancient ancestor of wheat. The whole grain variety requires overnight soaking and 30 to 40 minutes on the stovetop to yield a tender grain. Farro is lower in calories and higher in muscle-building protein and cancer-fighting fiber than other whole grains, and it&rsquos rich in B vitamins and zinc.

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 200
Fat: 1.5 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 0 mg
Carbohydrates: 37 g
Dietary fiber: 7 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 7 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Farro Salad with Roasted Beets, Watercress, and Poppy Seed Dressing
Ingredients
2 bunches small beets, trimmed
2/3 cup uncooked farro
3 cups water
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
3 cups trimmed watercress
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
1/2 cup (2 ounces) crumbled goat cheese
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons toasted walnut oil
2 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream
1 1/2 teaspoons poppy seeds
2 teaspoons honey
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
2 garlic cloves, crushed

Preparation
Preheat oven to 375°.

Wrap beets in foil. Bake at 375° for 1 1/2 hours or until tender. Cool peel and thinly slice.

Place farro and 3 cups water in a medium saucepan bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 25 minutes or until farro is tender. Drain and cool. Stir in 1/2 teaspoon salt.

Arrange 1 1/2 cups watercress on a serving platter top with half of farro, 1/4 cup onion, and half of sliced beets. Repeat layers with remaining 1 1/2 cups watercress, remaining farro, remaining 1/4 cup onion, and remaining beets. Sprinkle top with cheese.

Combine remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, vinegar, and remaining ingredients stir well with a whisk. Drizzle vinegar mixture evenly over salad.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Walnuts are a tasty source of plant-based fatty acids and boasts more polyphenols than red wine. Having 4 grams of protein per ounce, walnuts also have the ability to keep your heart healthy. They contain cancer-fighting properties, support weight control and, in some studies, have been shown to be neuroprotective.

Serving size: half a cup

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 327
Fat: 33 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 1 mg
Carbohydrates: 7 g
Dietary fiber: 3.4 g
Sugars: 1 g
Protein: 8 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Wild Rice and Walnut Pilaf
Ingredients
1 teaspoon butter
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
2 1/2 cups water
3/4 cup long-grain brown and wild rice blend (such as Lundberg’s)
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon olive oil
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts, toasted

Preparation
Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add onion cook 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in water, rice, and 1/4 teaspoon salt bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 40 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat stir in 1/4 teaspoon salt, parsley, chives, juice, and oil. Sprinkle each serving with walnuts.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Rich in monounsaturated fats, almonds have been shown to be helpful in keeping cholesterol levels within a healthy range. They&rsquore also effective prebiotics, feeding the probiotics in our gut, and they help support a robust immune system. Almonds, like all nuts, are good sources of the antioxidant vitamin E, which may play a role in slowing cognitive decline with age.

Serving size: five almonds

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 35
Fat: 3 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 0 mg
Carbohydrates: 1.3 g
Dietary fiber: 0.8 g
Sugars: 0.3 g
Protein: 1.3 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Almond Green Beans
Ingredients
1 tablespoon butter
1/4 cup slivered almonds
2 teaspoons minced fresh garlic
12 ounces trimmed green beans
3 tablespoons water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation
Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add almonds cook 2 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring constantly. Remove from pan with a slotted spoon. Add garlic to pan cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Add green beans, water, salt, and pepper. Cover and cook 4 minutes or until beans are tender and liquid evaporates. Sprinkle with almonds.

Why they&rsquore good for you: Despite their tiny size, chia seeds deliver an incredible amount of nutrition. In a two-tablespoon serving, you&rsquoll find 11 grams of fiber, four grams of protein, five grams of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids, nearly 20 percent of a day&rsquos worth of calcium, plus potassium and antioxidants.

Nutrition per serving:
Calories: 138
Fat: 8.7 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 5 mg
Carbohydrates: 12 g
Dietary fiber: 10 g
Sugars: 0 g
Protein: 4.7 g

Recipe from Cooking Light: Five-Seed Bread
Ingredients
1/4 cup unsalted, roasted sunflower seeds kernels
1 tablespoon chia seeds
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1 teaspoon poppy seeds
2 tablespoons honey
1 package dry yeast (about 2 1/4 teaspoons)
1 1/2 cups warm water (100° to 110°)
4.2 ounces sweet white sorghum flour (about 1 cup)
3.9 ounces potato starch (about 3/4 cup)
2.3 ounces cornstarch (about 1/2 cup)
1 tablespoon xanthan gum
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 cup canola oil
1 teaspoon white vinegar
2 large eggs, lightly beaten

Preparation
Combine first 5 ingredients in a small bowl, stirring to combine. Set aside.

Dissolve honey and yeast in 1 1/2 cups warm water in a medium bowl let stand 5 minutes.

Weigh or lightly spoon flour, potato starch, and cornstarch into dry measuring cups level with a knife. Place flour, potato starch, cornstarch, xanthan gum, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl beat with a mixer at medium speed until blended. Add seed mixture, yeast mixture, oil, vinegar, and eggs beat at low speed until blended.

Spoon batter into a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Cover with plastic wrap coated with cooking spray, and let rise in a warm place (85°), free from drafts, 45 minutes or until dough reaches top of pan.

Bake at 375° for 45 minutes or until loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Cool 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack remove from pan. Cool completely on wire rack.


Easy dinner recipes: Three citrus salad ideas to keep it light

This savory take on the comfort food -- stuffed with bacon, Gruyere cheese and dandelion greens and pan-fried to ooey-gooey perfection -- works well served any time of the day. Recipe: Savory stuffed French toast

(Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

(Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Wild mushroom soup is a rich purée. Recipe: Joe’s wild mushroom soup

(Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

(Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

A thick, 2-pound, bone-in rib steak, some coarse sea salt and pepper. It doesn’t take much more to make a perfect main course. Recipe: Cote de boeuf

(Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

(Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

(Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times)

(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

This savory take on bread pudding is studded with chanterelle mushrooms.
Recipe: Chanterelle-sage bread pudding

(Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

Stuffing is an excellent canvas for creativity. Start with bread cubes, add aromatics for subtle flavoring and liquid to keep it moist.
Recipe: Chestnut-sage stuffing

(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Dinner doesn’t get much easier than a basic salad, but why not dress it up a little with all the great citrus to be found in the market right now? Slices of sweet tangerines or rich pink grapefruit, or segments of vibrant blood orange, can add just the right tang to a salad, not to mention added texture and bright color.

Beets and blood oranges with mint and orange flower water: “My idea of salad in winter is similar to my take on salad in general,” says chef Suzanne Goin. “It’s a way of celebrating what’s around now. I’m a big fruit-and-vegetable fan, and that becomes the focus for me.” She combines roasted beets with sliced blood oranges in a vivid display of color and flavor, tossed with thinly sliced fresh mint and a dressing of blood orange and lemon juices, shallot, red wine vinegar, olive oil and fragrant orange flower water.

Pink grapefruit and fennel salad with crab: Fresh pink grapefruit, arugula, freshly shaved fennel and red onion are tossed in a simple dressing of olive oil, grapefruit juice and red pepper flakes, the salad tossed with Dungeness crab meat in this simple yet rich dinner option. The recipe, from Food editor Russ Parsons, comes together in only 20 minutes.

In 2009, Food did a story on fresh tofu in Southern California. We included a recipe for fresh, homemade tofu -- very light in flavor, this delicate tofu is almost like a custard with its creamy texture.

The method is simple: Combine some cold soy milk with nigari water (a brine used to set the soy milk) and steam the milk until it sets up like a custard. The whole process takes about 15 minutes.

- See more at: https://latimesblogs.latimes.com/dailydish/2012/03/test-kitchen-tips-homemade-tofu.html#sthash.6Tjk9w9Z.dpu
In 2009, Food did a story on fresh tofu in Southern California. We included a recipe for fresh, homemade tofu -- very light in flavor, this delicate tofu is almost like a custard with its creamy texture.

The method is simple: Combine some cold soy milk with nigari water (a brine used to set the soy milk) and steam the milk until it sets up like a custard. The whole process takes about 15 minutes.

- See more at: https://latimesblogs.latimes.com/dailydish/2012/03/test-kitchen-tips-homemade-tofu.html#sthash.6Tjk9w9Z.dpuf
In 2009, Food did a story on fresh tofu in Southern California. We included a recipe for fresh, homemade tofu -- very light in flavor, this delicate tofu is almost like a custard with its creamy texture.

The method is simple: Combine some cold soy milk with nigari water (a brine used to set the soy milk) and steam the milk until it sets up like a custard. The whole process takes about 15 minutes.

- See more at: https://latimesblogs.latimes.com/dailydish/2012/03/test-kitchen-tips-homemade-tofu.html#sthash.6Tjk9w9Z.dpu
In 2009, Food did a story on fresh tofu in Southern California. We included a recipe for fresh, homemade tofu -- very light in flavor, this delicate tofu is almost like a custard with its creamy texture.

The method is simple: Combine some cold soy milk with nigari water (a brine used to set the soy milk) and steam the milk until it sets up like a custard. The whole process takes about 15 minutes.

- See more at: https://latimesblogs.latimes.com/dailydish/2012/03/test-kitchen-tips-homemade-tofu.html#sthash.6Tjk9w9Z.dpuf
In 2009, Food did a story on fresh tofu in Southern California. We included a recipe for fresh, homemade tofu -- very light in flavor, this delicate tofu is almost like a custard with its creamy texture.

The method is simple: Combine some cold soy milk with nigari water (a brine used to set the soy milk) and steam the milk until it sets up like a custard. The whole process takes about 15 minutes.

- See more at: https://latimesblogs.latimes.com/dailydish/2012/03/test-kitchen-tips-homemade-tofu.html#sthash.6Tjk9w9Z.dpu
CALIFORNIA COOKBOOK: Find hundreds of great recipes

Tangerine, butter lettuce and goat cheese salad: Sweet tangerine segments are combined with butter lettuce, fresh goat cheese and crunchy toasted hazelnuts in this easy salad which uses only a handful of ingredients and comes together in a mere 30 minutes (and that includes roasting time for the hazelnuts!).
You can find all three recipes below.

And for more ideas, click through our easy dinner recipes gallery and check out our Dinner Tonight page, devoted to recipes that can be made in an hour or less. Looking for a particular type of recipe? Comment below or email me at [email protected]

BEETS AND BLOOD ORANGES WITH MINT AND ORANGE FLOWER WATER

Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Note: From A.O.C. chef-owner Suzanne Goin

3 bunches small to medium beets

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons best-quality olive oil, divided

2 tablespoons finely diced shallot

1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

A few drops orange flower water

Freshly ground black pepper

12 mint leaves, sliced thinly on the diagonal

1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Cut the greens off the beets, leaving about half an inch of the stems attached. (Save the leaves for sauteing later.) Clean the beets well, and toss them with 2 tablespoons olive oil and 1 teaspoon salt.

2. Place the beets in a roasting pan with a splash of water in the bottom. Cover tightly with foil and roast about 40 minutes, until tender when pierced. (The roasting time will depend on the size and type of beet.)

3. When the beets are done, carefully remove the foil. Let them cool, then peel them by slipping off the skins with your fingers. Cut the beets into one-fourth inch thick slices.

4. Slice the stem and bottom ends from four of the blood oranges. Stand the oranges on one end and, following the contour of the fruit with your knife, remove the peel and cottony white pith. Work from top to bottom, rotating the fruit as you go. Slice the oranges thinly, into 8 to 10 pinwheels, and discard the seeds.

5. Juice the remaining blood orange. Combine the diced shallot, vinegar, lemon juice, one-fourth cup blood orange juice and one-half teaspoon salt in a small bowl and let sit 5 minutes. Whisk in the remaining one-half cup olive oil, and a drop or two of orange flower water (be careful, it can be overpowering a little goes a long way). Taste for balance and seasoning. Carefully toss the beets in a bowl with half the vinaigrette and a sprinkling of salt and pepper. Taste for seasoning.

6. Place one-third of the beets on six chilled plates, loosely in a random pattern. Continue arranging the oranges, mint and remaining beets, layering the ingredients, letting them intertwine but not pile up on one another too much. You should have a beautiful, natural-looking mosaic effect. Spoon the rest of the vinaigrette over the salads and sprinkle a few drops of orange flower water over each one.

Each serving: 303 calories 3 grams protein 25 grams carbohydrates 5 grams fiber 22 grams fat 3 grams saturated fat 0 cholesterol 79 mg. sodium.


Shaved Apple & Fennel Salad with Swiss

This is a simple recipe inspired by a dish that Farmer Kristin ate while spending time in Northern Italy. It's a perfect for an afternoon snack.

Ingredients

  • 1 apple, shaved or sliced thinly
  • ½ a fennel bulb, shaved or sliced thinly
  • 1 ½ cups of frisee or other bitter green
  • 1 oz Swiss cheese, cut into small cubes
  • Salt to taste
  • Drizzle of olive oil

Method

Layer the shaved apple on the serving plate. Scatter the shaved fennel on top of the apple. Bunch the greens together and place them in the center of the plate on top of the apple and the fennel. Sprinkle the cubed cheese over all of the ingredients. Lastly, add a pinch of salt and drizzle the olive oil over the ingredients. Serve with grilled bread, and sparkling water or white wine.


Watch the video: Εάν έχετε λίγα μανταρίνια, φτιάξτε αυτό το σούπερ γλυκό! Μυρωδάτο Κέικ με μανταρίνι ή Μανταρίνόπιτα


Comments:

  1. Moogugore

    In my opinion you are not right. I am assured. Write to me in PM, we will communicate.

  2. Tremaine

    And so it is too :)

  3. Nebei

    For real?



Write a message