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Cannellini in Tomato-Sage Sauce

Cannellini in Tomato-Sage Sauce


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Ingredients

BEANS

  • 3 cups (about 21 ounces) dried cannellini (white kidney beans)
  • 4 whole garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1 large bunch fresh sage leaves
  • 16 whole black peppercorns

SAUCE

  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 12 large fresh sage leaves
  • 8 whole garlic cloves, peeled
  • 2 pounds plum tomatoes, seeded, coarsely chopped

Recipe Preparation

BEANS

  • Place beans in large bowl; cover generously with water. Let stand at room temperature overnight.

  • Drain beans; transfer to heavy large pot. Add 3 quarts water, oil, garlic, sage bunch, and peppercorns. Bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer uncovered until beans are tender, about 1 hour 5 minutes. Remove from heat; mix in salt. Cool beans 1 hour. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Refrigerate in water.

SAUCE

  • Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add sage and garlic; sauté 2 minutes. Add tomatoes and sauté until tomatoes soften and begin to release juices, about 8 minutes.

  • Drain beans, reserving cooking liquid. Discard sage bunch. Mix beans into tomato sauce. Simmer over medium-low heat until sauce thickens slightly and flavors blend, adding reserved cooking liquid by half cupfuls if mixture is dry, about 30 minutes (beans should have slightly soupy consistency). Season with salt and pepper. Serve beans warm or at room temperature.

Reviews Section

Rachel Roddy's recipe for white beans with tomato and sage

“Q uando vanno a tavola devono sapere che qualcuno ha portato quelle cose a tavola, e quelle persone siamo noi.” When they sit at the table, they must remember someone brought the food to the table, and those people are us.

The words of a bracciante (agricultural worker) speaking in Piazza San Giovanni last Sunday. Also speaking were bike couriers, whose work has taken on new significance and toll in the concentrated days of lockdown teachers, whose lives are made even more difficult by the precariousness of short-term contracts and substitutions airport and airline workers carers refugees and migrants young architects expected to work for pitiful sums and “experience” mothers in a Catch-22 of work and childcare musicians and theatre workers the homeless, and many others. It was a gathering of those whom the trade unionist and activist Aboubakar Soumahoro describes as gli invisibili – the invisible ones. The unseen seen, on a stage flanked with twin banners for a movement called Stati Popolari in front a well-spaced, masked crowd, in front of Rome’s oldest basilica.

As the sun beat down, Soumahoro raised a black plastic crate filled with vegetables, a few kilos representing the millions picked every year by the braccianti, many of them vital migrants doing essential work, undocumented and pitifully paid, without rights, anything near humane living conditions – conditions compromised further by coronavirus, social distancing another privilege denied.

These are the stories Aboubakar Soumahoro has been documenting in his video diaries these are the braccianti he represents. Born in Bétroulilié on the Ivory Coast, Aboubakar has lived in Italy since 1999, and the age of 19. His thesis on graduation with honours from L’Università Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II was an analysis of the conditions of migrant workers in the Italian market. His work as an activist and trade unionist is an continuation of his sociology degree and thesis, and a single-minded dedication to the rights of migrant workers – to all workers. The stories told on the stage were, of course, as different as the people who told them. What united them all, though, was a call to listen and remember who is delivering our food, stepping in to teach our kids, loading our bags, picking our tomatoes and beans. Once we engage in these daily acts of remembering and recognition, we can act, ask our locals shops to change, force our governments to act.

It is near impossible not to recognise a San Marzano tomato, a slender curving plum that fits perfectly in a pan. A DOP protects the geographical status (in Campania) of this fleshy tomato. Who can we trust to tell us the braccianti who picked the tomatoes have the same protection? Like working at home, or social distancing, being able to choose what you eat is a privilege that I never take for granted.

I do take sage for granted, though, and use lots of it (too much according to my partner) in this Tuscan recipe for beans cooked with tomatoes and sage. This dish is often called fagioli all’uccelletto, which, according to the writer Pelegrino Artusi, was because the ingredients were similar to those used to cook little birds. Who needs birds though, when sage is so mustily persistent and meaty?


Beans in Tomato-Sage Sauce


1 Place the beans in a large bowl with cold water to cover by 2 inches. Place them in the refrigerator to soak 4 hours up to overnight.

2 Drain the beans and place them in a large pot with cold water to cover by 1 inch. Bring the liquid to a simmer. Cover and cook until the beans are tender, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Add salt to taste and let stand 10 minutes.

3 In a large saucepan, cook the sage and garlic in the oil over medium heat, flattening the garlic with the back of a spoon, until the garlic is golden, about 5 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes.

4 Drain the beans, reserving the liquid. Add the beans to the sauce. Cook 10 minutes, adding some of the reserved liquid if the beans become dry. Serve warm or at room temperature.

From "1,000 Italian Recipes." Copyright 2004 by Michele Scicolone. Used with permission of the publisher, Wiley Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Nutritional Facts:

This Beans in Tomato-Sage Sauce recipe is from the Cook'n in Italy Cookbook. Download this Cookbook today.


Directions

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Meanwhile, heat oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add minced garlic to oil. Cook for about 2 minutes until garlic begins to soften.

Add tomatoes with their juices and sage to the saute pan. Bring to a simmer and continue cooking for about 10 minutes until juices have reduced slightly, stirring occasionally.

Add white beans to tomatoes and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Continue to simmer sauce over medium while you cook pasta according to package directions.


8 Secrets For a Moist & Juicy Roast Turkey

What is it?

These large Italian beans are one of the many varieties of the common bean. They are ivory in color, relatively large and long when cooked, with a creamy texture. When a recipe simply calls for “white beans,” cannellini are an excellent, widely available choice.

Kitchen math:

1 cup dried beans = 2-1/2 cups cooked beans

Don’t have it?

Great northern beans or white navy beans are fine substitutes.

How to choose:

Choose dried beans that look plump, unwrinkled, and evenly colored. Pick over dried beans before using to remove any small pebbles.

How to prep:

Canned cannellini should be thoroughly rinsed before using. Dried cannellini should be soaked before cooking, both to speed cooking time and to reduce any gas-causing tendencies. There are two ways to soak dried beans: Overnight soak: Rinse the beans, then cover with an inch of cold water and let soak at room temperature for at least four hours or overnight. Drain and rinse the beans before cooking them. Quick-soak method: Rinse the beans, then put in a saucepan, cover with an inch of water, and bring to a boil. Boil for a few minutes and then let them soak for an hour off the heat, drain, and then add fresh water and continue cooking. Soaked cannellini will cook in 60 to 90 minutes. Use 3 cups of water for each cup of uncooked beans, and you can season the beans by adding bay leaves, herb sprigs, or garlic cloves to the cooking water. The myth that adding salt to beans while they cook will toughen their skins is completely false, so feel free to salt while cooking to boost the beans’ flavor.

How to store:

Canned beans have a shelf life of 2 to 3 years. Store dried beans in a covered container for up to 1 year. You can precook cannellini and store them, refrigerated, in their cooking liquid for up to 3 days.

Cross Reference

Private Notes

Recipes


Recipe Summary

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 4 boneless pork loin chops, pounded thin
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon fennel seeds, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce
  • 2 fluid ounces water
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • salt and pepper to taste

Heat the oil in a skillet over high heat, and quickly brown the pork chops on both sides. Transfer chops to platter, and keep warm.

Reduce skillet heat to medium, and cook the onion until tender. Mix in the sugar, chili powder, fennel, red pepper flakes, and oregano. Stir in the tomato sauce, water, and Worcestershire sauce, and bring to a boil.

Return the pork chops to the skillet. Cover, reduce heat to low, and cook 10 minutes. Remove cover, and continue cooking 15 minutes, or to desired doneness.


I love this recipe for this time of year. It’s freezing outside, you’re kinda lazy after cooking over Christmas so you just want to make something really quick and tasty, you’re trying to be healthy and lose the few extra “lbs” you’ve gained over the festive season and you have very little in the fridge. This recipe suits all these needs, it’s really wholesome and comforting and most importantly simple to make.

what you need for 2:

2 x 400g cans of cannellini beans

sea salt and black pepper

chop your onions and garlic:

chop your sage and heat up your olive oil:

add your onions and chili and cook for about 10 mins over a low heat until onions are soft and translucent, do not colour them.

add your garlic and sage and cook for a further 5-10 mins:

bring a small pot of water to the boil and pop your tomatoes in for about 2 minutes and remove when the skin starts to crack:


Wednesday, 25 November 2009

Easy Chicken Pie

One of my definite highlights of last week was the chicken pie I had on Saturday night. I have been really busy lately with college and work and I've been having some medical issues too. Just keeping the house straight seems to be falling under the radar. I really need to put time aside to keep everything in shape.

So I have been looking for really simple dishes that I can make with little effort. This chicken pie is one of them. Its starting to get chilly here, we seem to have had some unseasonably warm weather recently but I think there is starting to be a nip in the air, which calls for warming pies and hearty stews.

The original recipe called for sweetcorn, which I'm not a big fan of, so I used leeks and peas instead and they worked really well. The pie was creamy without being cloying, and the parsnip mash was good, if a little sweet, I think potato mash, as was in the original recipe, would have been better.


Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Baby, It's Cold Outside.

I've got some exciting news this week, virtual world! Even though I'm in the DR, the international school I work for celebrates Thanksgiving, meaning that I have Thursday and Friday off from work this week!

Right now I'm in Step 1: "Pep Talk Mode". Patrick Swayze and Baby's Dirty Dancing scene as they land the big lift is repeated over and over in my head. Sylvester Stallone, jabbing and fist pumping in general, is an image I'm trying to focus on. You know, for inspiration. From the "greats".

The Amurican Flag is fitting for Thanksgiving, right? A nice touch.
Step 1: "Pep Talk Mode", also goes hand-in-hand with Step 2: Preparation: getting the shopping done at a reasonable price and preparing a schedule of how I'm going to get everything made for Friday evening. Jab those high prices! Go on! Fist pump with me!
Is it ironic that the first pictures that are not originally mine,
taken by the fiance nor I,
are of Sylvester Stallone?

To everyone else out there celebrating the day with their families and friends - Happy Turkey Day! Take pictures to share with us on La Buena Fe!!



First, place the potatoes, eggplant, carrots, and squash in a large mixing bowl. Add the curry, ground coriander, cumin, paprika, salt, and 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Mix well. The trick to vegetable soup is to make sure your vegetables are well seasoned!

Next, heat the last tablespoon of olive oil in a large skillet and sauté the onions over medium heat until they are soft. Add the garlic for 30 seconds, and then stir in the eggplant, carrots, and whatever other vegetable you would like to add. Turn the heat to low and cover the skillet for around 10 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft. Make sure to stir occasionally so the vegetables do not burn.

Finally, pour in the tomatoes, chicken/vegetable stock, potatoes, and squash, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and the let the soup simmer for 20-30 minutes, or until the potatoes and squash are tender. Add salt if necessary. Serve hot!

Mama's White Chicken Chili


1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 medium chopped onions
2 cloves of garlic
3 cups chicken broth
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon red pepper sauce (hot sauce)
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon salt
1 (11 oz.) can of white corn, drained
1 (15 oz.) can of cannellini beans, drained
1 (15 oz.) can butter beans, drained
2 cups chopped cooked chicken breast

First, heat the vegetable oil in your cooking pot and cook the onions until they are beginning to soften. Add the garlic for around 30 seconds. Stir in the remaining ingredients, except the chicken. Heat to boiling, and then lower the heat and simmer uncovered for 20 minutes. Finally, add the chicken and cook until hot!

*** Squeeze extra lime juice in both soups for a surprising kick! ***


Cannellini in Tomato-Sage Sauce - Recipes

For the Beans:
3 cups (about 21 ounces) dried cannellini (white kidney beans)
3 quarts cold water
5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
4 whole garlic cloves, peeled
1 large bunch fresh sage leaves
16 whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoon salt

For the Sauce:
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
12 large fresh sage leaves
8 whole garlic cloves, peeled
2 lbs plum tomatoes, seeded, coarsely chopped

Directions: Prepare the Beans:
Place beans in large bowl cover generously with water.

Let stand at room temperature overnight.

Drain beans transfer to heavy large pot.

Add 3 quarts water, olive oil, garlic, sage bunch, and peppercorns.

Bring to boil over medium-high heat.

Reduce heat to medium-low simmer uncovered until beans are tender, about 1 hour 5 minutes.

Remove from heat mix in salt.

Cool beans 1 hour. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Refrigerate in water.)

Prepare the Sauce:
Heat olive oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat.

Add sage and garlic saute 2 minutes.

Add tomatoes and saute until tomatoes soften and begin to release juices, about 8 minutes.

Drain beans, reserving cooking liquid.

Mix beans into tomato sauce.

Simmer over medium-low heat until sauce thickens slightly and flavors blend, adding reserved cooking liquid by half cupfuls if mixture is dry, about 30 minutes (beans should have slightly soupy consistency).